Friday, April 2, 2010

Interview with a Student

A student came to interview me yesterday for a project which required students to interview a professor they find interesting about teaching and learning. I will reproduce the interview here because it was lots of fun to answer the questions.

Q.: How long have you been teaching?

A.: This year, I will celebrate the 20th anniversary of my teaching career. I'm not ancient, I just started very early. [The last statement was in response to the interviewer's incredulous look.]

Q.: What makes a bad student?

A.: In my teaching philosophy, there are no bad students. There are only students who did not receive enough attention, encouragement, and support from the teacher.

Q.: How do you find a balance between work and personal life?

A.: In our profession, it is very easy to do so. We only have to be at work 2 or 3 days a week, seven months in a year.

Q.: Then why do so many professors complain that they are overworked and never have time for anything?

A.: I guess they are a lot more responsible than I am.

Q.: How do you preserve your enthusiasm for teaching? I often see professors who look like they don't even care. How do you avoid that?

A.: I'm sure they care a lot. Everybody's teaching style is different, so some people are not as demonstrative as others.

Q.: What advice would you give to freshmen?

A.: Dedicate your first year of college to learning how to learn.

4 comments:

Pagan Topologist said...

Does the workload you described mean that you do not consider scholarly work and research to be working? I spend a lot more time than that on my work, although the teaching portion could be described that way. If the non-teaching part is play instead of work, then that fits, I suppose.

I really enjoy your blog.

Clarissa said...

Thank you so much!

By "work" I mean having to be some place at a defined time and not being able to leave whenever I want. :-) Research for me goes under the category of fun. Right now, for example, I'm reading detective novels in preparation for a conference in May. That really doesn't feel like "work." :-)

profacero said...

Although, the irony: I thought a professor job would be like that, but most of mine have had hours that look more like banker's hours due to scheduling of classes and meetings!

profacero said...

Although, the irony: I thought a professor job would be like that, but most of mine have had hours that look more like banker's hours due to scheduling of classes and meetings!